Solo Travelers

Traveling Solo Doesn’t Have to Mean Being Alone

Author: Road Scholar

Traveling Solo Doesn’t Have to Mean Being Alone

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Group Trips for Solo Travelers

Barbara Winard has been traveling solo since she was a single woman in her 20s in the 1970s. Now in her 70s and married, Winard’s husband doesn’t have much interest in travel, but that doesn’t stop her from exploring the world. Winard enjoys the company of other older adults when she travels, so she chooses to travel solo but with a group on programs with Road Scholar, the world leader in educational travel for older adults for nearly 50 years.

“One of the things about becoming a functioning team is the realization that there is no right way to travel,” says Winard. “Couples, like singles, must figure out their schedules, bank accounts and family responsibilities … but they should also not forget their dreams.” 

Barbara is one of more than 19,000 solo female travelers that enroll in learning adventures with Road Scholar each year. Road Scholar has been seeing growing demand for single rooms on their learning adventures over the past ten years. The not-for-profit organization recently released a report on solo travelers which showed a rise in solo travel, due in large part to more older women like Barbara who are traveling without their spouses. 

To respond to that growing trend, Road Scholar has created a collection of innovative solos-only journeys, catering to individuals seeking enriching adventures while enjoying the company of like-minded solo explorers. 

Programs in the solos-only collection span from Louisiana to Lima, and Italy to India. Road Scholar’s program designers have hand-selected dates of some of their most popular itineraries for their pilot. Each participant who enrolls in a solos-only program will get their own private room but can join the group knowing they’ll be among other solo travelers.

“We serve tens of thousands of solo travelers every year, so we understand their unique needs,” said Maeve Hartney, Chief Program Officer Road Scholar. “Although all of our programs offer a welcoming and inclusive environment for solos, these new programs have a greater comfort level and more opportunities to make new friends.”

Just like all Road Scholar programs, these exclusive trips feature expert-led educational experiences, comfortable accommodations, and carefully planned itineraries that balance structured activities with ample free time for personal exploration. Solo travelers can delve into the local culture, engage in hands-on learning opportunities, and forge lasting friendships with others who share their passion for discovery.

“Traveling solo doesn’t mean you have to journey alone,” added Hartney. “Our solo traveler trips foster a sense of camaraderie, allowing participants to bond over shared experiences and create memories that will last a lifetime.”

Barbara Winard says there are lots of benefits to traveling on her own without your spouse— from saving money to having someone at home to care for pets. She says that being on her own empowers her to meet new people more easily, and she enjoys bringing stories back to share with her partner. But one of the greatest benefits of solo travel, she says, is learning about yourself. “There’s nothing quite like the satisfaction of having accomplished something on one’s own in the world, and it is exciting to discover new hobbies, talents and strengths.”

Road Scholar’s solo traveler trips are designed for adults over 50, whether they’re seasoned globetrotters or embarking on their first solo adventure. With the support of experienced Group Leaders and a vibrant community of fellow travelers, solo adventurers can explore the world with confidence and curiosity.

For more information about Road Scholar’s solo traveler trips and to view the full range of destinations and itineraries available, visit www.roadscholar.org/collections/solo-travelers-only/.

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